Skip to main content
Izabela Steflja
Professor of Practice
504-314-7064
300E Hebert Hall

Education

PhD, University of Toronto, Political Science

Biography

I am a Professor of Practice in International Development at Tulane University. I hold a DPhil in Political Science from University of Toronto, and an MA in Political Science from McGill University. Before my appointment at Tulane, I was the Simons Post-doctoral Fellow in Dialogue on International Law and Human Security at Simon Fraser University (2014-2015), and a Predoctoral Fellow in International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science (2013). My research interests lie at the intersection of international development, comparative politics of the developing world, and international criminal law. I have conducted extensive fieldwork in East and Central Africa and the Balkans and my current book manuscript examines local perceptions of international criminal tribunals. In addition, I am working on a research project that investigates female perpetrators of crimes against humanity.

Interests

International development; International studies; Transitional justice; Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity; Conflict and post-conflict studies; Nationalism and ethnicity; Gender; Intersectionality; African studies; The Balkans

Contributions

2018 “Internationalised Justice and Democratisation: How International Tribunals Can Empower
Non-Reformists,” Third World Quarterly. Published online March 15 2018.


2018 “The production of the war criminal cult: Radovan Karadžić and Vojislav Šešelj at The Hague.”
Nationalities Papers: The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity 46(1): 52-68 (2018). Published
online Nov 06 2017.


2015 “To History or to Hollywood? Monuments to Foreign Celebrities in Twenty-First Century
Balkans.” Europe-Asia Studies 67 (8): 1302-1327.


2013 (with J. T. Darden) “Making Civilian Casualties Count: Approaches to Documenting the Human
Cost of War.” Human Rights Review 14(4): 347-366.

2010 “Identity crisis in post-conflict societies: the ICTY’s role in defensive nationalism among the
Serbs.” Global Change, Peace & Security 22(2): 233-250.