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Tulane's School of Liberal Arts is committed to excellence in teaching and learning. We have moved to online teaching and are monitoring developments related to the coronavirus (COVID-19). For more information, click here.

Faculty and all instructors in the School of Liberal Arts: Please login to Canvas for the most recent announcements and teaching instructions.

 

A Macroregional Perspective on Early Urbanism in Formative Central Mexico

Friday, April 5, 2019 - 12:00

M.A.R.I. is happy to announce the sixth talk of the 2018-19 Brown Bag talk series.

Dr. Tatsuya Murakami, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, presents his research titled:

A Macroregional Perspective on Early Urbanism in Formative Central Mexico: A View from Tlalancaleca, Puebla
12:00 pm 
Friday, April 5
Rm. 305, Dinwiddie Hall

[CANCELLED AS OF 3/12/2020] Archaeology Brownbag Talk--"Working on an Old Excavation and Its Fragmented Records: The Case of the House of the Frescoes at Knossos" (Emilia Oddo, Friday, 3/13/2020, 12:00PM, DW 305)

Friday, March 13, 2020 - 12:00

The Tulane University Center for Archaeology presents an archaeology brownbag lunch talk.
 
[CANCELLED AS OF 3/12/2020]
 
"Working on an Old Excavation and Its Fragmented Records: The Case of the House of the Frescoes at Knossos"
Emilia Oddo, Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, Tulane University
Friday, 3/13/2020, 12:00PM, Dinwiddie Hall Room 305
 

"Empowering Ruins: An Archaeology of Two Activist Spaces in Detroit, Gordon Park and the Grande Ballroom"

Friday, February 28, 2020 - 12:00

The Tulane University Center for Archaeology presents an archaeology brownbag lunch talk.
 
"Empowering Ruins: An Archaeology of Two Activist Spaces in Detroit, Gordon Park and the Grande Ballroom"
Krysta Ryzewski, Associate Professor, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
Friday, 2/28/2020, 12:00PM, Dinwiddie Hall Room 305
 

The Hidden Landscapes of the Ancient Maya

Thursday, March 5, 2020 - 19:00

Lecture hosted and organized by the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane's Middle American Research Institute. The lecture will serve as an inauguration presentation to the 17th Tulane Maya Symposium and will celebrate collaborations between New Orleans and Latin American institutions.

Head shaping: Shifting bodies and shifting understandings of self and culture in pre-Columbian northern Chile

Friday, February 28, 2020 - 15:30

Please join us on Friday, February 28 for the first Anthropology colloquium of the semester. Dr. Christina Torres-Rouff from the University of California, Merced will present a talk titled, "Head Shaping: Shifting Bodies and Shifting Understandings of Self and Culture in Pre-Columbian Northern Chile" in Dinwiddie Hall Room 102. Please see the abstract below.
 

Understanding Maya Fare: Beyond Tamales and Cacao

Friday, March 6, 2020 - 16:00

In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya.  The K-12 Educator Workshop will focus on a basic introduction to Maya archaeology and cultural heritage of the Maya today. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from chocolate specialists and our Kaqchikel language scholar will discuss the importance of corn.

Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

Saturday, January 25, 2020 - 09:00

This collaborative workshop is designed for middle to high school Social Studies educators to enhance the teaching of the Tunica community while highlighting this group as part of a series of ancient civilizations currently taught at the K-12 level. This workshop is the first one in the series aimed at increasing and extending the current teaching of ancient civilizations in the Americas.

Tunica-Biloxi Language in the K-12 Classroom

Saturday, January 25, 2020 - 09:00

This collaborative workshop is designed for K-12 Social Studies educators to enhance the teaching of the Tunica community while highlighting this group as part of a series of ancient civilizations currently taught at the K-12 level. This workshop is the first one in the series aimed at increasing and extending the current teaching of ancient civilizations in the Americas. The local focus on Louisiana indigenous people and culture will enable educators to create deeper connections when teaching about indigenous identity across the Americas such as the Maya, the Aztec and the Inca.

Archaeology Brownbag Talk--"The Poverty Point Earthworks in Louisiana" (Tristram Kidder, Friday, 1/17/2020, 12:00PM, DW 305)

Friday, January 17, 2020 - 12:00

The Tulane University Center for Archaeology presents an archaeology brownbag lunch talk.
 
"The Poverty Point Earthworks in Louisiana"
Tristram Kidder, Professor of Anthroplogy and Environmental Studies, Washington University in St. Louis
Friday, 1/17/2020, 12:00PM, Dinwiddie Hall Room 305
 
The Tulane University Center for Archaeology hosts periodic brownbag lunch talks about diverse topics in archaeology, of interest to scholars, students, and staff members in several schools, departments, and institutes at Tulane.

"Living With the Dead in Roman Italy"

Friday, November 22, 2019 - 12:00

The Tulane University Center for Archaeology presents an archaeology brownbag lunch talk.
 
"Living With the Dead in Roman Italy"
Allison Emmerson, Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, Tulane University
Friday, 11/22/2019, 12:00PM, Dinwiddie Hall Room 305
 
The Tulane University Center for Archaeology hosts periodic brownbag lunch talks about diverse topics in archaeology, of interest to scholars, students, and staff members in several schools, departments, and institutes at Tulane.
 

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