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Christopher B. Rodning
Professor & Graduate Studies Coordinator
504-862-3051
418 Dinwiddie Hall - Lab 212

Education

Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A.B. Harvard University

Biography

Fields of Study: North American archaeology, culture contact and colonialism, and the archaeology of cultural landscapes.

Professor Rodning received his A.B. in anthropology from Harvard University in 1994, and his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2004. His interests as an archaeologist include relationships between people and place as they are manifested in monuments, mortuary practices, architecture and the built environment, and settlement patterns. Several recent and current projects concentrate on cases of culture contact and colonialism, and, particularly, encounters and entanglements between Native Americans and European explorers and colonists in western North Carolina and elsewhere in eastern North America. Professor Rodning teaches courses on North American archaeology, culture contact and colonialism, and the archaeology of cultural landscapes.

Recent News:

Selected Publications:

Beck, Robin A., Jr., Christopher B. Rodning and David G. Moore (editors)

2016 Fort San Juan and the Limits of Empire: Colonialism and Household Practice at the Berry Site. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. (forthcoming in January/February 2016)

Rodning, Christopher B.

2015 Center Places and Cherokee Towns: Archaeological Perspectives on Native American Architecture and Landscape in the Southern Appalachians. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa. (forthcoming in June/July 2015)

Rodning, Christopher B.

2014 Cherokee Towns and Calumet Ceremonialism in Eastern North America. American Antiquity 79:425–443.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2012 Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Shell Gorgets from Southwestern North Carolina. Southeastern Archaeology 31:33–56.

Rodning, Christopher B., and David G. Moore

2010 South Appalachian Mississippian and Protohistoric Mortuary Practices in Southwestern North Carolina. Southeastern Archaeology 29:80–100.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2010 Architectural Symbolism and Cherokee Townhouses. Southeastern Archaeology 29:59–79.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2010 Place, Landscape, and Environment: Anthropological Archaeology in 2009. American Anthropologist 112:180–190.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2009 Mounds, Myths, and Cherokee Townhouses in Southwestern North Carolina. American Antiquity 74:627–663.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2009 Domestic Houses at Coweeta Creek. Southeastern Archaeology 28:1–26.

Beck, Robin A., Jr., David G. Moore, and Christopher B. Rodning

2006 Identifying Fort San Juan: A Sixteenth-Century Spanish Occupation at the Berry Site, North Carolina. Southeastern Archaeology 25:65–77.

Wilson, Gregory D., and Christopher B. Rodning

2002 Boiling, Baking, and Pottery Breaking: A Functional Analysis of Ceramic Vessels from Coweeta Creek. Southeastern Archaeology 21:29–35.

Rodning, Christopher B.

2002 The Townhouse at Coweeta Creek. Southeastern Archaeology 21:10–20.

Rodning, Christopher B., and Amber M. VanDerwarker

2002 Revisiting Coweeta Creek: Reconstructing Ancient Cherokee Lifeways in Southwestern North Carolina. Southeastern Archaeology 21:1–9.

Eastman, Jane M., and Christopher B. Rodning (editors)

2001 Archaeological Studies of Gender in the Southeastern United States. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.