Fall 2023 Courses

Knowledge of Greek and Latin is NOT required for these courses, and students majoring in other fields are encouraged to enroll. Tulane's Language Learning Center has language-specific instructions for placement testing, information about and registration for proficiency testing, links to presentation recordings, and more.

Courses taught in other departments that may be counted toward the CLAS, GREK, or LATN majors can be found at the bottom of this page.

General Education Note:  The general education requirements for incoming students beginning in Fall 2018 have been revised.  Students who began before Fall 2018 will follow the previous requirements.  For clarity, both sets of requirements will be listed for each course.

Fa18:  General Education requirements for students entering in Fall 2018 or later.
Pre-Fa18:  General Education requirements for students who entered in before Fall 2018.

Use this list as a guide, but please verify all questions with our Director of Undergraduate Studies.

UNDERGRADUATE CLASSICS COURSES

CLAS-1010: The Rise of Rome (3)
This course traces the history of Rome from its earliest foundations to the fall of the Roman republic.  While learning about major historical events, we will also explore various aspects of Roman cultural and social history. Topics for discussion include politics, social status, gender roles, religion, warfare, murder and conspiracy, and ancient spectacle.  The course is open to everyone with an interest in learning more about Roman History, and there are no prerequisites.
(Pre-Fa18: Not open to senior history majors. In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Cultural Knowledge requirement for either Humanities or Social Sciences; it also fulfills the Western Traditions requirement. May be counted towards the major in History.)

CLAS-1030: The Greeks (3)
A look at life in ancient Greece. Topics include war, politics, religious festivals, athletics, courts and trials, wealth and poverty, freedom and slavery, gender and sexuality, theater, family life, education, and science.
(Pre-Fa18: In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Western Traditions requirement.)

CLAS-1040: Mythology (3)
This course will introduce you to the gods, heroes, and monsters of Greek and Roman mythology! The focus of the course involves reading and discussing selected works of ancient Greek and Roman literature in English translation, but we will also move beyond these narratives to examine how the Greeks and Romans portrayed their myths in other media, including art and architecture. Myths (from the Greek word μῦθος, meaning story or tale) are a way to explore, explain, and comment on human society, a cultural process that was of central importance to the ancient Greeks and Romans, and which we still share today.

CLAS-2020: High Roman Empire (3)
This course introduces the institutional, social, and cultural changes of the empire from Augustus to Diocletian. Emphasis is placed upon the birth of imperial administration, cultural change and continuity, and the rise of Christianity.
(Pre-Fa18: In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Cultural Knowledge requirement for either Humanities or Social Sciences; it also fulfills the Western Traditions requirement. May be counted towards the major in History.
Fa18: NTC 1st Tier)

CLAS-2410: Race - Antiquity to U.S. (3)
What is race? This course examines how race is constructed by cultures, focusing on the ancient Mediterranean and the modern United States. Together, we will explore literary and artistic evidence to understand how the Greeks and Romans conceptualized the world and the humans within it. As we will see, ancient thinkers found numerous ways to explain human variety, none of which correspond precisely to modern notions of race. Flowing forwards and backwards in time, we will investigate how the authors of America’s racial caste system pressed Greece and Rome into the service of contemporary power structures, reimagining them as ancestors of White America. Additionally, we will study Black Americans—enslaved and free—who have pushed against this reconstruction, reclaiming the ancient Mediterranean as their own.

CLAS-3120: Etruscans & Early Rome (3)
From the Late Bronze Age until their assimilation into the Roman world, the Etruscans were building cities, decorating tombs, and establishing trade networks at home and abroad. While their literature and written history are lost, their extensive material culture survives. In this course, students will learn how to examine a culture known primarily from its artifacts, and discover how it influenced early Rome.
(Pre-Fa18: In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Cultural Knowledge requirement for either Humanities, Fine Arts, or Social Sciences; it also fulfills the Western Traditions requirement. May be counted towards the major in Art History.
Fa18: NTC 1st Tier)

CLAS-3170: Greek Art & Archaeology (3)
In this course, we will explore the archaeological remains and the development and use of specific artistic trends of the ancient Greek culture. Human inhabitation of Greece left the remains of a rich and complex society, with grandiose public architecture, elaborate vase painting, and a legacy that still lives on. Working together as a class, we will explore how to use these material remains to find the Greeks, interpret their lives, and understand their choices and the impact they had on their culture. By studying a variety of archaeological remains, from pottery to art and architecture, we will bring the Greeks back to life, in class, with us! We will cover aspects of Greek political organization, trade and contact with other civilizations in the ancient Mediterranean, funerary habits. At the same time, we will be discussing about our modern approach to the study of the Greeks, focusing on the use of art and archaeology in politics and propaganda, current problems and controversies in Greek archaeology, archaeological methods, and issues of archaeological ethics.
(Pre-Fa18: In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Cultural Knowledge requirement for either Humanities or Fine Arts; it also fulfills the Western Traditions requirement. May be counted towards the major in Art History.)

CLAS-3510: The Ancient Novel (3)
We are all familiar today with the literary form called the novel: a lengthy fictional narrative in prose. It was ancient Greek and Latin authors, however, who first created this form. Many of these works survive and they always intrigue and delight readers with their highly sophisticated plotting of love affairs, comical depictions of pirates, and teasing explorations of sexuality. We will closely read, in English translation, the major ancient novels and some of their literary predecessors in order to understand the originality of the form and content of the novels. The class concludes with a consideration of the ancient novels contribution to the development of fiction in the West.
(Fa18: NTC 1st Tier)

CLAS-4080: Seminar in Ancient Society and Economy (3-4)
Seminar on topics involving ancient society and economy, for example, Slavery in Ancient Society or Family in Ancient Rome. May be repeated when the topic is different. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive). (Pre-Fa18: In the Core Curriculum, this course fulfills the Cultural Knowledge requirement for either Humanities or Social Sciences; it also fulfills the Western Traditions requirement. May be counted towards the major in History. Fa18: NTC 1st Tier)

CLAS-4811: Special Topics (3)
Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology

 

UNDERGRADUATE GREEK COURSES

Note: Courses in ancient Greek and Latin may be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

GREK-1010: Elementary Greek (4)
The study of ancient Greek language offers students an exciting opportunity to gain a nuanced sense of how language works as well as develop the skills to read Homer, Plato, the New Testament, etc. without the filter of translation. Designed to get students reading Attic Greek with facility, this course follows a grammar-based approach that moves students from learning the alphabet to reading real Greek as quickly as possible. This course requires no language background.

GREK-2030: Attic Prose (4)
This course focuses on reading selections from a range of prose authors, e.g., Plato, Herodotus, Xenophon. In addition to improving their proficiency in reading Greek, students develop further familiarity with prose styles and begin to acquire skills in literary, historical, or philosophical analysis. Prerequisite: GREK 1020 or equivalent.

GREK 4110 Special Authors (3)
Readings from ancient Greek authors not covered in other courses.
(Fa18: NTC 1st Tier, NTC 2nd Tier)

 

UNDERGRADUATE LATIN COURSES

Note: Courses in ancient Greek and Latin may be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

LATN-1010: Elementary Latin (4)
In this course, students learn the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax so that they can begin reading snippets of Latin literature. Prerequisite: none.

LATN-2030: Intro to Literature (4)
This course provides an introduction to Latin prose and poetry through readings from some of the great works of Latin literature.  While reading a broad selection of Latin texts, we will consider how Roman literature evolved along with the changing culture and politics of the city.  We will also learn about important authors, historical figures, and events that you are likely to encounter again later in your studies.  The class emphasizes precise and accurate translation, vocabulary building, and grammatical understanding. Prerequisite: LATN 1020 or equivalent. This course is only offered in the Fall semester.

LATN-4040: Roman Philosophy
Readings in Latin from Lucretius, Seneca, and other authors.
(Fa18: Tier One Writing)