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Newcomb Art Department

Newcomb Art News
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 12:34

 

Visiting Professor Deniz Karakas has organized an online watercolor painting workshop with Istanbul-based artist Gabrielle Reeves. The workshop will take place on Thursday, October 29 at 3:40pm CST. 

Zoom meeting link: https://tulane.zoom.us/j/92590266996

For the workshop please have prepared:

1: A reference photo from which you will work.  This can be any subject but do consider what your watercolor and drawing level is. You may have the photo reference on your computer screen or print it out. There is no requirement about this besides making sure you have a clear and large enough image to work from.

2: Prepare the size of your watercolor paper to 15cm x 20cm.  You can either cut the paper down to this size or use masking tape.

3: Optional but recommended: If you have time, begin to draw out your image lightly in pencil on the prepared 15cm x 20cm paper, including all of the details that you think you will need for the painting.  Because drawing can take a long time, it would be recommended to at least begin this process so that you have more time to paint.  

4: Have all of your materials ready: Watercolor paper (plus extra sheets for techniques and color mixing), watercolor kit, brush(es), jar of water, paper towels or painting rags, reference photo, pencil and eraser.
 
This workshop is sponsored by CELT (Center for Engaged Learnign and Teaching).
Monday, October 26, 2020 - 10:59

Please join us this Thursday, October 29 at 5pm via Zoom for a talk by Dr. Ananda Cohen-Aponte (Cornell University), "The Materiality of Insurgency in the Colonial Andes."  This presentation explores themes of loss, erasure, and effacement of artworks in eighteenth-century Peru and Bolivia, positing the modification of material culture as a form of world-making by considering case studies from the Tupac Amaru and Katari Rebellions, which sought the overthrow of Spanish colonial rule. 

Traditional art historical studies that focus exclusively on fully intact or “museum quality” artworks distort our understanding of fraught periods of history, and particularly rebellions and uprisings, due to severe censorship campaigns in their aftermath that sought to restore colonial order through targeted iconoclasm. This presentation offers new insights for writing about art’s entanglement with political violence, underscoring the gains that can be made through interdisciplinary methodologies for recovering Indigenous and Afro-Indigenous artists and subjects that have been erased from the official archive. 

This talk is part of the year-long "Representation and Resistance: Scholarship Centering Race in Western Art" lecture series organised by the Newcomb Art Department and co-sponsored by the Africana Studies Program.  Dr. Cohen-Aponte's lecture is also co-sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and is the 2020 Terry K. Simmons Lecture in Art History for this year. 

Zoom meeting info:  https://tulane.zoom.us/j/98937431062

Monday, October 5, 2020 - 10:00

Victoria I. Lyall (MA Tulane, PhD UCLA), the Mayer Curator of Pre-Columbian Art at the Denver Art Museum, co-edited a recently published book titled ReVisión: A New Look at Art in the Americas.

“ReVisión” collects essays from scholars of Latin American art history to help others understand the region’s nuanced history of creation, destruction, and renewal. In addition to essays, ReVisión showcases work from artists such as Alexander Apóstol, Juan Enrique Bedoya, Johanna Calle, and Ronny Quevedo in order to help visualize the questions of identity, exploitation of natural resources, and displacement from both before and after the conquest.” - University of Chicago Press

The book is also accompanied by an upcoming exhibition at the Denver Art Museum (dates TBA).

Lily Filson (BA Tulane, MA Syracuse, PhD, Ca'Foscari) published an article titled "Reformation England and the Performance of Wonder: Automata Technology and the Transfer of Power from Church to State" in Society and Politics vol. 13, no. 2.

Lucia Momoh (MA Tulane) published an article titled “The Art of Erasure” in The Iron Lattice, an art and culture print magazine based in New Orleans.

Two of our Art History and Latin American Studies PhD candidates have just recently published Smarthistory essays, "The History of Mexico: Diego Rivera’s Murals at the National Palace" by Megan Flattley and "Painting Aztec History" by Hayley Woodward. This was part of a special COVID-era program to support emerging art history scholars, sponsored by the Kress Foundation. 

Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 13:20

Colouring the Caribbean Race and the art of Agostino Brunias By Mia L. Bagneris
Associate Professor Mia L. Bagneris has been appointed Director of the Africana Studies Program at Tulane.  On June 25th she was interviewed by Tulane School of Liberal Arts Dean Brian T. Edwards for the Give Green Tulane campaign. You can read Prof. Bagneris’s new essay, “Miscegenation in Marble: John Bell’s Octoroon” in June issue of The Art Bulletin (102, no. 2) June 2020, pp. 64-90. In her words: “[A]nalysis of The Octoroon contributes to a growing body of recent scholarship that seeks to address a lacuna within art history by probing the relationship of art and visual culture to the histories of race, slavery, colonialism, and empire.” Her book, Colouring the Caribbean: Race and the art of Agostino Brunias  was published by Manchester University Press in 2018.

Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 10:38

Solar Print
The Carroll Gallery will be hosting a trio of pop-up art events for the Tulane community this fall. The series kicks off Thursday, October 15th with an Interactive Chalkboard Mural inspired by Candy Chang’s “Before I Die” project + #ColorOurCollections, inspired by a project launched by the New York Academy of Medicine, with large-scale coloring sheets based on collections from museums, archives and other cultural institutions around the world.

On Thursday, October 22nd, join us for Recycled Journal Making. Stop by and make a small hard-cover journal out of recycled cardboard and hardware.

On Thursday, November 12th we will make Solar Prints. Gather materials to create a photogram using light, water, and photo-s ensitive paper. Inspired by Man Ray’s Rayographs.

All pop-up events are open 9:00 am – 4:00 pm in the Carroll Gallery.
 Free and open to the Tulane community. 
Social distancing: Limited to 10 people at a time in gallery.

Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 09:40

Edgar Degas, New Orleans Cotton Exchange, 1873

Michelle Foa's article "In Transit: Edgar Degas and the Matter of Cotton, between New World and Old," was just published in the September 2020 issue of The Art Bulletin. Edgar Degas’ four-month stay in New Orleans in 1872-73, which marked his first experience crossing the Atlantic, resulted in two remarkable paintings of a cotton office. Foa’s article analyzes the important connections between Southern cotton, the textiles that fill the artist’s pictures of dancers, laundresses and bathers, and the paper he used for many of his drawings. 

This year she has given lectures at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (virtually) and Wofford College. In July she joined the Board of Directors of the National Committee for the History of Art.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020 - 10:41

A new virtual lecture series has been organized by Mia L. Bagneris and Michelle Foa of the Newcomb Art Department and is being co-sponsored by the Africana Studies Program.

Featuring a diverse array of scholars, such as Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Jennifer Van Horn, and Caitlin Beach, Representation and Resistance: Scholarship Centering Race in Western Art will showcase research that centers BIPOC people as artists, as subjects of representation, and as viewers.Talks in the series will illuminate the intersections of race and representation, including strategies of resistance employed by artists and spectators of color, in the visual and material cultures of the United States, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean from the early modern period through the nineteenth century.All talks will be presented via Zoom and will be free and open to the public.

Please join us for the inaugural lecture  by Jennifer Van Horn, Associate Professor of Art History and History, University of Delaware. 

 ‘No one could prevent us making good use of our eyes’: Enslaved Spectators and Iconoclasts on Southern Plantations
Thursday, September 10, 6pm CDT

The lecture will take place online

Zoom Meeting ID: 928 2640 9178 Passcode: 165843

This lecture uses the portrait to tell an alternative history of American art: how enslaved people mobilized portraiture in acts of artistic defiance.It traces the ways that bondpeople denied planters’ authority and reversed dehumanization by gazing on white elites’ portraits, an act of rebellion that remains understudied.  This lecture is also supported by the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South. 

[Image Caption: Daphne Williams, Age about 100, 1936-38]

Thursday, August 20, 2020 - 12:54

The Newcomb Art Department is thrilled to announce that Megan Flattley, PhD candidate in Art History and Latin American Studies at Tulane, has been awarded a Fulbright-Hays DDRA (Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad) 12-month grant. She plans to conduct research in Mexico City June 2021 to May 2022. Her dissertation, “Out of the Fragments, New Worlds: Perspective and Spatiality in the Work of Diego Rivera, 1913-1933” analyzes how Rivera responded to Cubism’s break with linear perspective in his transition from easel painting to mural work. Her research foregrounds Rivera’s place in an international network of avant-garde artists concerned with modernist theories of space and revolutionary politics. Congratulations, Megan!!! 

Image: Rivera’s mural in the Palacio Nacional, Mexico City.

Thursday, July 23, 2020 - 12:56
The Newcomb Art Department's Carroll Gallery is pleased to announce its premier exhibition for Fall 2020. Art for Activism is an exhibition of over 40 works organized by Art for Activism, a group of Tulane artists made up of current students as well as alumni, in support of Black Lives Matter.
Artists included in the exhibition predominantly practice in New Orleans and responded to a Call for Artists, recognizing "the power that art has to inspire discussion, revision, and a shifting of opinions and culture in a way that words often can’t."

The work in the exhibition will be sold via silent auction with proceeds going to Mobilizing Millennials, a local organization dedicated to “recovering the fabric of true American democracy and promoting social equity and economic mobility.”  Artists have been asked to submit recent work that addresses themes of systemic and individual racism and the Black Lives Matter movement, with a goal of encouraging hope and a shifting of opinions and culture towards something better.

People can come see the work in the Carroll Gallery throughout the duration of the exhibition, August 10 - September 30, but the designated auction window will be Thursday, August 20th from 7:00 - 8:00 pm and will take place online. Art for Activism will be posting all work on their Instagram feed @art.foractivism in the weeks leading up to the auction.

Exhibition organizers:  Emery Gluck, Brandon Surtain, and Carlyn Morris
Opening date:  Monday, August 10, 2020
Gallery hours:  M – F, 9 am – 4 pm 
Silent Auction (online):  August 20th, 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Closing date: Thursday, September 3, 2020
Instagram: @art.foractivism @mobilizingmillennials

There will be no receptions in the gallery until further notice.  Viewers will be expected to wear face coverings and maintain social distance in the gallery. The Carroll Gallery is located in the Woldenberg Art Center on Tulane's uptown campus. (map )
 
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 11:06
The Newcomb Art Department's Carroll Gallery is pleased to announce its premier exhibition for Fall 2020. Art for Activism is an exhibition of over 40 works organized by Art for Activism, a group of Tulane artists made up of current students as well as alumni, in support of Black Lives Matter.
Artists included in the exhibition predominantly practice in New Orleans and responded to a Call for Artists, recognizing "the power that art has to inspire discussion, revision, and a shifting of opinions and culture in a way that words often can’t."

The work in the exhibition will be sold via silent auction with proceeds going to Mobilizing Millennials, a local organization dedicated to “recovering the fabric of true American democracy and promoting social equity and economic mobility.”  Artists have been asked to submit recent work that addresses themes of systemic and individual racism and the Black Lives Matter movement, with a goal of encouraging hope and a shifting of opinions and culture towards something better.

People can come see the work in the Carroll Gallery throughout the duration of the exhibition, August 10 - September 30, but the designated auction window will be Thursday, August 20th from 7:00 - 8:00 pm and will take place online. Art for Activism will be posting all work on their Instagram feed @art.foractivism in the weeks leading up to the auction.

Exhibition organizers:  Emery Gluck, Brandon Surtain, and Carlyn Morris
Opening date:  Monday, August 10, 2020
Gallery hours:  M – F, 9 am – 4 pm 
Silent Auction (online):  August 20th, 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Closing date: Thursday, September 3, 2020
Instagram: @art.foractivism @mobilizingmillennials

There will be no receptions in the gallery until further notice.  Viewers will be expected to wear face coverings and maintain social distance in the gallery. The Carroll Gallery is located in the Woldenberg Art Center on Tulane's uptown campus. (map )